#FridayFictioneers : Season of Change

I work on poetry at my other blog, A Full Cup of Tea, and dabble in some short stories and flash fiction here with the FRIDAY FICTIONEERS. Every Friday authors from around the world gather to share their 100 word stories based on the photo prompt hosted by Rochelle Wisoff. We offer support, constructive criticism, and encouragement to each other . Readers are encouraged to comment. My contribution for the week follows the photo prompt below…

PHOTO PROMPT - © Jennifer Pendergast

PHOTO PROMPT – © Jennifer Pendergast

An aging woman with long black braided hair tugged on the canoe and shouted, “Do not leave me!”

“I must go. I am no longer a child; I have to make something of myself,” the young man answered calmly, without looking.

“You can do that here, among our people.”

“Now is the time for changes. These trees are turning from green to red after harvest just as my hair is beginning to fade from chestnut to rust.”

“Where will you go?”

“I will head south. Scouts told of the new army camp set up by the river.”

“Be careful, son.”

–Historical Fiction: 100 words–

Background: The characters in this story are based on my own family tree. My 6th great-grandmother on my mother’s side was a full-blood Cherokee woman of the Long Hair Clan. “Prisoners of war, orphans of other tribes, and others with no Cherokee tribe were often adopted into this clan”. She was married to a Scottish immigrant for a short time; I’m not sure how they met or became married. They had two children before divorce. Her son, my 5th great-grandfather, became and interpreter for the Cherokee Nation and a scout for the United States Army from the information I can find. I don’t know what they really looked like or if they really had any moments like this, but I imagine they had complex relationships and lived in a very dynamic time in history. I obviously took on the Scottish genetic traits with there being some Scotch/Irish on the other side of my tree to produce that double recessive MCR1 red hair gene.

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FRIDAY FICTIONEERS: Signs

FRIDAY FICTIONEERS: EVERY FRIDAY AUTHORS FROM AROUND THE WORLD GATHER TO SHARE THEIR 100-WORDS BASED ON THE PHOTO PROMPT HOSTED BY ROCHELLE WISOFF, OFFERING CONSTRUCTIVE CRIT AND ENCOURAGEMENT TO EACH OTHER. READERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO COMMENT AS WELL. BACK FROM A WINTER BREAK, HERE’S MY SHORT CONTRIBUTION…

Copyright -Claire Fuller

Copyright -Claire Fuller

The sign’s kept up mostly out of spite I s’pose. There ain’t too many men working these days, ‘specially needin’ a smoke. Heck even the robots can maintenance themselves. It’s what happens when ya keep on asking for more without give none back. We took too much then nature had to take it back. My son says it’s physics. I s’pose.

Good thing tho’ –peoples are still needing signs to keep people away from robots, people away from other people, and it still takes a man to know where to put the sign. Even the ironic signs of no use.

—Dystopia 100 words—

FRIDAY FICTIONEERS: Aphrodite’s Sister

FRIDAY FICTIONEERS: EVERY FRIDAY AUTHORS FROM AROUND THE WORLD GATHER TO SHARE THEIR 100-WORDS BASED ON THE PHOTO PROMPT HOSTED BY ROCHELLE WISOFF, OFFERING CONSTRUCTIVE CRIT AND ENCOURAGEMENT TO EACH OTHER. READERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO COMMENT AS WELL. BACK FROM A WINTER BREAK, HERE’S MY SHORT CONTRIBUTION…

Copyright-Dawn Q. Landau

Copyright-Dawn Q. Landau

Legends tell of Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty, born from the sea, but time has forgotten the tale of her sister. A siren of the sea luring men to their demise and mother to all mermaids. After trying to flood the earth to rule with Poseidon, Zeus punished the goddess with legs; she’s never to return to her watery home. On a clear night when the sea is calm you can hear her singing out the song of the mermaids from her pink box on the beach. A song that bears instructions for man’s watery demise.

—Mythology: 97 words—

FRIDAY FICTIONEERS: Tough day?

Copyright - Douglas M. MacIlroy

Copyright – Douglas M. MacIlroy

“Tough day?” the winged creature sitting on the cloud next to the check-in gate asked as a tardy friend dragged in.

“Like you wouldn’t believe. I think that kid has a death wish,” the winged friend confessed.

“Better yours than mine,” the first winged creature lowered his voice, “I think mine might be you-know-who in the flesh.”

“What makes you say that? You’re done early everyday,” the friend prodded.

“Because the kid shuts himself up in his room after school everyday and doesn’t come out until morning. He’s not doing homework; I’ve seen his grades.”

“Think we should tell Him?”

—100 words—

FRIDAY FICTIONEERS: EVERY FRIDAY AUTHORS FROM AROUND THE WORLD GATHER HERE TO SHARE THEIR 100-WORDS BASED ON THE PHOTO PROMPT HOSTED BY ROCHELLE WISOFF, OFFERING CONSTRUCTIVE CRIT AND ENCOURAGEMENT TO EACH OTHER. READERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO COMMENT AS WELL. FOR MORE FRIDAY FICTIONEERS’ STORIES…

Consumed

Copyright -Kent Bonham

Copyright -Kent Bonham

In apartment 205 Lucy’s alarm screamed repeatedly to be silenced as the midday sun berated it through parted shutters. There had been no need for Lucy to set the alarm, she was let go on Friday. All that hard work, all those long hours at the office, had been for nothing.

Perhaps she had forgotten the alarm was still set for Monday morning when she poured a tall glass of wine Saturday night. Perhaps she set it on purpose as a way to pull her back to reality as she popped pill after pill, finishing off the bottle of wine.

—–100 words—–

Part 1: Imaginary

FRIDAY FICTIONEERS: EVERY FRIDAY AUTHORS FROM AROUND THE WORLD GATHER HERE TO SHARE THEIR 100-WORDS BASED ON THE PHOTO PROMPT HOSTED BY ROCHELLE WISOFF, OFFERING CONSTRUCTIVE CRIT AND ENCOURAGEMENT TO EACH OTHER. READERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO COMMENT AS WELL. FOR MORE FRIDAY FICTIONEERS’ STORIES…



Ghoulish Flash Fiction A to Z: Qalupalik (Inuit mythology)

The shoreline was beginning to see a few hours of daylight now, so Aga bundled up Kiviuq for a walk along the shore. He had been begging all week to go help the other men of the village with the clean up from the oil spill. Maybe they could find one small animal still alive to help clean up and save; she hated to expose him to this tragedy so early.

“Don’t wander away or the Qalupalik will take you for herself.”

“Ducky!” Kiviuq exclaimed at his find, but it was too late for both as the sea woman grabbed Kiviuq.

Copyright-Janet Webb

Copyright-Janet Webb

—–101 words—–

Today’s short haunting is inspired by the Qalupalik, a sea woman who abduct children who wander from their children.

It’s also time for Friday Fictioneers. Where every friday bloggers from around the world gather to share their 100-word stories based on the photo prompt hosted by Rochelle Wisoff. For more Friday Fictioneer Stories…